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Old 13-04-2010, 01:17 PM   #46
cheddatom
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all my plug ins are 32 bit and I guess wouldn't fit into C5. Also, i'm not sure if my "distributor" has C5 in stock.

Another thing - why would I go with Win7 over XP64? This PC is purely for recording.

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Old 13-04-2010, 02:09 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by cheddatom View Post
all my plug ins are 32 bit and I guess wouldn't fit into C5. Also, i'm not sure if my "distributor" has C5 in stock.

Another thing - why would I go with Win7 over XP64? This PC is purely for recording.
I don't think you'd have a problem to be honest - one of my friends is running C5 on a 64bit OS and has no issues...

I may be wrong but I don't think XP64 ever got much further than beta and definitely isn't supported any more (along with normal XP) - point being Win7 is very stable, small on resources and things tend to work immediately without any messing about!
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Old 13-04-2010, 02:28 PM   #48
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Apparently lots of VSTs won't transfer to 64 bit Cubase.

I run XP64 here at work, and it's really good. Just XP really. I do like Win 7, i'm just wondering what's going to be better for running Cubase. I literally run nothing else on this machine.

I'll check with my distributor to see if they have C5 in stock.
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Old 13-04-2010, 06:57 PM   #49
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I've just moved from a 32bit system to a 64bit and Reaper x64 didn't like a lot of my plugins, worked fine once I used the 32 bit Reaper though.
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Just was playing that guitar, and i think a pickup change is in order. you know something's wrong when a guitar makes an OR120 sound as thin as green screen kid looks...
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Old 14-04-2010, 08:22 AM   #50
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I didn't know there was a reaper 64. I've still not tried reaper. I'll investigate 64bit VSTs.
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Old 19-04-2010, 12:24 AM   #51
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Just a few tips really on how I can make my rough recording sound a bit more like the original.

Ive got all the tracks down bar the viola which im doing this week.

Anyway heres the original (great song, great band).



and heres my recording so far with some basic compression and eq as well as some stereo widening and a poor effort to recreate the "double vocal effect".

http://soundcloud.com/assassin231/go...hed-18th-april

also please be fully aware I know that some guitar parts aren't 100 percent correct and the drums are weird at the start. Also for the record I don't play xylophone on a regular basis! The recording is based on microphone capture and mixing/processing of the audio after, not the performance.

Any tips?

EDIT: the_man if you read this I tried out Izotope RX and I couldn't manage to get rid of that hiss (which is on the left and right acoustic tracks) without getting rid of the higher frequencies.
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Old 19-04-2010, 03:59 PM   #52
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sounds like the drums have been bus compressed to make them "boomier", the whole original mix sounds pretty compressed, but then that is probably youtubes poor quality.

if you are aiming to get it exactly like the original, then the guitar might be better without the stereo widening and just panned pretty central which is how it sounds in the original.

If there is hiss on the guitar that you want to get rid of, something to try would be to get like, an 8 band EQ, and take a node and set the Q as thin as it will go, then raise it up quite a few dB and sweep it across until you find a frequency at which the hiss sounds really prominant and harsh like so:



Then just cut those frequencies.

Alternatively, if you have a De-esser, that is usually a good option to remove his or harsh frequencies at quite a specific (or within quite a specific) frequency range.
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Old 19-04-2010, 07:01 PM   #53
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im fairly sure that if RX cant remove it, you're doomed
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Old 28-04-2010, 12:08 AM   #54
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I'm recording a track at the moment that has a flute solo, but i'm not sure what microphone would be best. I was thinking large diaphragm condenser, but that might make it too bright maybe? Really, i'd like to use a ribbon mic but I haven't got any of those to use
Need to decide where to position the mic and even if I should use more than one. Never recorded a flute before, and I want the best sound

Any suggestions?

Or should I just keep experimenting and see which gives the best sound? Bit short on time though =/
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Old 28-04-2010, 08:32 AM   #55
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get the performer to play and stick your head around the flute. You probably don't want to be that close but could do with quite a dry room. Stick a stereo pair of condensors where it sounds nice. If it's too bright take some of the top off in your DAW.
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Old 28-04-2010, 07:07 PM   #56
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yeah I imagine a pair of condensers would do the tick, I doubt there would be any issues with brightness as its not like they will boost highs a huge amount (if at all), but any nasty tone can be taken out in the DAW as tom said.

As for positioning, just set the two mics up say, between 0.5-1 metre apart and get your musician to stand between the two and move backwards and forwards to just try and find the sweet spot, remember that the harder he plays, the higher the input will be, so if you get the levels set fairly high whilst he is playing at a moderate volume, if he plays heavily, it will clip.

Also, as you are using two mics, you need to try to make sure that he is as dead centre between the two mics as you can get him, else you might get some phase issues, not the end of the world if the final take does have phase as that can easily be solved, but it is something to take into consideration!
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Old 28-04-2010, 07:17 PM   #57
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yeah I imagine a pair of condensers would do the tick, I doubt there would be any issues with brightness as its not like they will boost highs a huge amount (if at all), but any nasty tone can be taken out in the DAW as tom said.

As for positioning, just set the two mics up say, between 0.5-1 metre apart and get your musician to stand between the two and move backwards and forwards to just try and find the sweet spot, remember that the harder he plays, the higher the input will be, so if you get the levels set fairly high whilst he is playing at a moderate volume, if he plays heavily, it will clip.

Also, as you are using two mics, you need to try to make sure that he is as dead centre between the two mics as you can get him, else you might get some phase issues, not the end of the world if the final take does have phase as that can easily be solved, but it is something to take into consideration!
Lollercops at this - do you only record human statues?
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Old 28-04-2010, 07:17 PM   #58
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I don't think you need to record a flute solo in stereo, unless you're trying to capture room ambience at the same time.

A LDC should be fine, never found a half decent one to be "bright", just add a touch of presence as they tend to boost around 12K if my memory serves me right, I don't think that would be an issue with a flute.
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Old 28-04-2010, 07:35 PM   #59
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Lollercops at this - do you only record human statues?
If they move, they get whipped.


I did think after writing it that for a flute-ist to stay still for the whole recording would be ridiculously impossible, but pressing backspace aaaaaaaaal thaaaaaaaat waaaaay looked so hard!

Maybe one condenser to close mic the flute, and a room mic? (obviously depending on how good the acoustics of the room are!)
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Old 29-04-2010, 09:04 AM   #60
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I don't think you need to record a flute solo in stereo, unless you're trying to capture room ambience at the same time.

A LDC should be fine, never found a half decent one to be "bright", just add a touch of presence as they tend to boost around 12K if my memory serves me right, I don't think that would be an issue with a flute.
I don't know if this has any basis in logic, but I always thought that with a moving performer, you've got more chance of getting something that sounds "consistent" with a stereo pair.

If you have the guy standing facing the front, and your best flute sound (I wouldn't know) is just to his left, you stick your mono mic there. Then, when he's performing, he starts to sway a bit, rotating to his right, away from the mic, creating an inconsistent level. If you have a stereo pair facing him, he will be rotating within the field of recording. You will be able to hear him swaying side to side.
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