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Old 22-02-2010, 07:26 PM   #16
lily93
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I think a lot of that 'professional sound' comes in the mixing stage tbh. Good mics/placement helps but as Haze says they're just colouring the source...
I disagree, a very high quality guitar rig, great guitar, great amp mantained properly, no buzz, hum, fret buzz, with a great player will get you most of the way there and....then mic choice, mic placement, gain staging it...... EQ will only be there to fit it in the mix against other instruments which will undoubtedly be within the same range frequency wise as the electric guitar.


There is no one part of the process that puts that 'professional sound' on a recording, it's done from right from the beginning to the very end with decent quality gear with a competent tech, you mightn't have to break the bank, but whatever you use, you should know exactly how to use it and why you needed it in the first place.

But you really do need a matched pair of humanoid audio receptors and you can't buy them in the shops.
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Old 22-02-2010, 08:27 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lily93 View Post
I disagree, a very high quality guitar rig, great guitar, great amp mantained properly, no buzz, hum, fret buzz, with a great player will get you most of the way there and....then mic choice, mic placement, gain staging it...... EQ will only be there to fit it in the mix against other instruments which will undoubtedly be within the same range frequency wise as the electric guitar.


There is no one part of the process that puts that 'professional sound' on a recording, it's done from right from the beginning to the very end with decent quality gear with a competent tech, you mightn't have to break the bank, but whatever you use, you should know exactly how to use it and why you needed it in the first place.

But you really do need a matched pair of humanoid audio receptors and you can't buy them in the shops.
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Old 22-02-2010, 08:44 PM   #18
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You don't need the best amp & guitars in the world, just got to know how to use what you've got to it's best.
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Old 22-02-2010, 08:49 PM   #19
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You can make a shit sounding amp and guitar sound pretty awesome once it is recorded, just like if you had an amazing amp and guitar and you processed it badly once it was recorded it would sound shit.
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Old 22-02-2010, 08:55 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by lily93 View Post
I disagree, a very high quality guitar rig, great guitar, great amp mantained properly, no buzz, hum, fret buzz, with a great player will get you most of the way there
All irrelevant... The buzz/hum etc to a lesser extent.

A guitarist has their sound (which ideally already slots into the mix as it is) - who's to say what's a professional guitar rig and what isn't?

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Originally Posted by lily93 View Post
and....then mic choice, mic placement, gain staging it...... EQ will only be there to fit it in the mix against other instruments which will undoubtedly be within the same range frequency wise as the electric guitar.

There is no one part of the process that puts that 'professional sound' on a recording, it's done from right from the beginning to the very end with decent quality gear with a competent tech, you mightn't have to break the bank, but whatever you use, you should know exactly how to use it and why you needed it in the first place.

But you really do need a matched pair of humanoid audio receptors and you can't buy them in the shops.
I'm assuming you realise mixing is more than eq/levels!

Anyway, given the budgets that we're working on, mic choice and preamp choices are likely to be highly limited and my point was/is that mastering advanced production techniques is going to give a more 'professional' sound than spending hours measuring mic distances
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Old 23-02-2010, 08:43 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by lily93 View Post
There is no one part of the process that puts that 'professional sound' on a recording, it's done from right from the beginning to the very end with decent quality gear with a competent tech, you mightn't have to break the bank, but whatever you use, you should know exactly how to use it and why you needed it in the first place.
I was talking about that "shitty demo" sound. You can use the best gear in the world, set up in the best way possible, record the best takes, then have no time for any mixing and it comes out with that shitty demo sound. Have you ever been to a studio and done 5 songs in a day or something equally stupid? It came out with a shitty demo sound. Ever listened to a local radio un-signed show?!?

So assuming you know what I mean now, what's the best way to avoid shitty, and head for "polished".
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Old 23-02-2010, 08:43 AM   #22
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at the end of the day, i wouldnt get out the measuring tape, i'd get out my ears have a listen to the sound in the room, consider what it sounds like and what you want to capture of it, go to the control room and make sure you're doing that. if you're not, move a mic or change model.
One of my big problems is a lack of control room. I have to rely on headphones.
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Old 24-02-2010, 07:02 PM   #23
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I was talking about that "shitty demo" sound. You can use the best gear in the world, set up in the best way possible, record the best takes, then have no time for any mixing and it comes out with that shitty demo sound. Have you ever been to a studio and done 5 songs in a day or something equally stupid? It came out with a shitty demo sound. Ever listened to a local radio un-signed show?!?

So assuming you know what I mean now, what's the best way to avoid shitty, and head for "polished".
you sure the mics were set up totally right? the sound even before much mixing of a properly tracked, properly mic'd session can be pretty fucking good (if a little quiet).
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Old 24-02-2010, 07:18 PM   #24
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I'm assuming you realise mixing is more than eq/levels!
And sometimes it is........putting endless fx on something because it was approached with the recording technique of ''stick a 57 on geetarz and snare and pan teh overheads all the way'' this is normally the case, you don't need to measure the length the diaphragm is from the source just because some guy that produced some band's albums some number of years ago had that approach, he was probably doing that just for the recall option...

Wasn't layla and countless other memorable classics recorded on things like fender champs. A shit guitar through a shit amp is always going to sound like a shit guitar, through a shit amp, doesn't happen these days as much, there are very good affordable amps and a 4x12 isn't need in the studio, but it still is fun to tear up

I don't think mastering is really going to make a song sound more professional or polished but it wouldn't do it any harm either
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Old 24-02-2010, 09:17 PM   #25
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aye, mastering should be the last choice call for sound quality improvements - since its the final process in a songs progression
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Old 25-02-2010, 09:21 AM   #26
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you sure the mics were set up totally right? the sound even before much mixing of a properly tracked, properly mic'd session can be pretty fucking good (if a little quiet).
Well, i'm talking about when I was 15 and we saved up to go to the best studio in stoke. he does a lot of work, has a great reputation, has done big bands etc (I don't like the way he mixes, but hey) and it sounded great in the control room on the day, but obviously 5 songs in one day always comes away sounding like a demo.

I'm not sure if you get what I mean by "shitty demo sound". It's hard to describe. It's just that feeling you get when you're listening to something, and (just from the sound of it) you know it's a demo, rather than a mix that's been laboured over.

To be fair I think some NIN has the shitty demo sound so maybe I should STFU.
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Old 25-02-2010, 06:16 PM   #27
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shitty demo sound to me implies something sounding dull, muffled or boxy, erratic volume levels, overall poor volume level and poor edits... oh and too much REVERB LOL. all things which could very feasibly happen if you try and do 5 songs in one day i guess.
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Old 25-02-2010, 08:35 PM   #28
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When you're 15, you aren't necessarily great musicians, which is what makes the difference.
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Old 26-02-2010, 09:19 AM   #29
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shitty demo sound to me implies something sounding dull, muffled or boxy, erratic volume levels, overall poor volume level and poor edits... oh and too much REVERB LOL. all things which could very feasibly happen if you try and do 5 songs in one day i guess.
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When you're 15, you aren't necessarily great musicians, which is what makes the difference.
I'm not explaining this very well. Have you never heard an unsigned band demo on the radio that sounds good but still sounds like a demo? Like my band's demos (the no logo stuff) we put so much effort into getting them right, and I absolutely love the sounds, and I think the mix is great, but if you put one on after a "proper" album, they sound like demos. So not really to do with a "bad" mix or a bad performance, but I don't know what it is to do with. Is it just some sort of feeling I personally have?

The creep joint album, i've worked on to the point where to me it sounds like a real album as opposed to a demo, and that feels like a massive achievement. How did I do it? Was it just the sheer amount of time put in to the mix and master? Spooky.
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Old 26-02-2010, 11:27 AM   #30
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I know what you mean. But it is hard to really pin point anything specific about what causes it. I guess it's little details right through the whole process.
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